Incline Public House

Cincinnati’s Incline Public House is created with two big ideas going for it: A low-key gastropub with a special focus on its unmatched view. With a great view of the cityscape and a menu inside with great pizza and beers, the place is frequently packed even when the view can’t be enjoyed. The prices keep relatively reasonable, and even though there is a long wait for the place on the weekends, it’s still an experience worth having.

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Don Pablo’s

Founded out of Texas in the mid-1980s, Don Pablos had expanded rapidly into the Midwest before a 2007 bankruptcy slashed the chain’s locations. Now, Don Pablo’s is back with a new menu and a new concept to make each location something of a party. The interior of each restaurant has a wide open, colorful and friendly concept and the menu an expansive bunch of Tex-Mex dishes focusing on great meat dishes and simple flavors. The chain has spots in many cities still, and it’s a overall a good experience.

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McGillicutty’s Family Sports Grub & Pub

Something of community sports bar for the south Kettering area, McGillicutty’s Family Sports Grub & Pub is mainly a place people like to go to enjoy a drink and a game of darts after work. Its clientele is heavily weighted toward the local neighborhood, and is very much a sports bar with inexpensive drinks and even more inexpensive grub. The bar isn’t a terrible place, but it could use an update. But when you head to the spot, I might suggest you grab something to eat beforehand.

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Dayton Racquet Club

Perched high atop Kettering Tower, Dayton’s tallest skyscraper, the elite Dayton Racquet Club is a members-only social establishment with a number of amenities, the most remarkable of which is a restaurant and lounge on the building’s 29th floor. It’s at this exclusive club that Dayton’s elite rub shoulders whether it’s for a gathering of business leaders over breakfast, a light lunch with a source, or cocktails after hours. The Racquet Club is good to its members, and the food here, matching the view, is top-notch.

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Submarine House

This Dayton chain is easy to recognize by its vexing “sixteen inches of heaven” jingle you used to hear on the radio all the time. Nowadays you hear it a little less often, but still Submarine House continues to be a successful sub and pizza chain, having half a dozen locations and now expanding into Columbus. Oh, and you know, the sub-eating contest they hold around this time every year, that’s also incredibly popular. The original location is very much a bar concept, but the expansions are all centered on a restaurant experience.

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Romeo’s Pizza

Since at least 2002, Romeo’s Pizza has been winning awards for its tasty pizza as it has slowly expanded to all of the major cities across Ohio. Now, with about 30 locations, Romeo’s seeks to become a local household name, and accolades have continued to pour in from local media. A new alternative to the big pizza delivery chains is here, and they’ve got more on the menu than pizza.

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Cygnet Pizza & Subs

As the epitome of a hole-in-the-wall, Cygnet Pizza & Subs serves the tiny northwest Ohio hamlet of 550. It’s one of only a few businesses in the area, surrounded by corn fields, roadways, and small, isolated clutches of homes. It’s hard not to be attracted to a place like this when there isn’t another option for miles. Right along the I-75 corridor, Cygnet is a quick trip from Findlay to the south and Bowling Green, and eventually Toledo to the north.

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Cadillac Jack’s Sports Bar & Grill

A startup chain currently operating three locations around Dayton, Cadillac Jack’s Sports Bar & Grill sports a very lively atmosphere and a vibrant decorum that will leave you reeling, and a huge menu of beers and burgers. It’s definitely a place for younger people and strives to be a popular nightspot. The food here is the same kind of bar food you’d find at any other chain, primarily burgers and wings and pizza. It seems like this place tries hard not to seem local, and with the exception of Bengal’s paraphernalia, you’d never know you were in Dayton once you walked in.

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